WordPress Challenge : I’d rather be…

I’d Rather Be…

Outdoors, naturally.

Eating, drinking, walking or even just lying back …..just being outdoors everyday, enjoying the view and of course taking photographs.


Grisedale Pike summit, The Lake District

Boscastle, Cornwall

Oh and eating ice cream…..



WordPress Challenge : Out of this world


The summit of Skiddaw at 3,054 feet : felt like being on the moon

A week in the Lake District – February 2018

This week we have been set a challenge by WordPress to share a familiar scene — a place you frequent, a face you know well, an activity you engage in regularly and make it look out of this world.

Anyone who knows me and Tim well will know that we have spent a good deal of our time (holidays) in the Lake District.  Boring people with our little adventures or maybe inspiring people to visit this beautiful place.

We have walked up, across and down all of the fells and it has shaped us. Learning about the land, the rock, reading maps and walking uphill!  Walking in the mountains in our fifties is actually easier than it was in our thirties which is incredible but true.

So, for this challenge I share more than the one photo I have added at the top which really felt ‘out of this world’.

For us it is a place we know well but on this latest trip it looked a little more snowy and magical than on previous visits.   We climbed high every day.


Ullock Pike – a ridge walk on the way up to Skiddaw


On Skiddaw summit – it’s a popular place


Grisedale Pike summit : time for lunch.  Looking to the western fells.


Skiddaw range, with the Pennines in the far distance


Near Haystacks summit


The town of Keswick way below and Helvellyn range to the right

The river at Grange after snowfall

Thinking about a trip to the Lake District?  I am happy to help with any questions, it’s like our second home.


Now over the last few days at home we have been visited by some truly Siberian conditions, as has most of the country, so snowy scenes are currently very familar.  But back in early February, on holiday, we were loving it!

Out of This World

Spring in the air : Overstrand to Cromer Pier

Sat on the pier eating chips in the warm sunshine. What a treat!

Saturday 17th February 2018

This Saturday we walked from Overstrand to Cromer and back. A short walk for us at only 4 miles in total. This gave us a bit of time to enjoy a coffee at the start and then a picnic on the pier at Cromer.

After being back at work for a week since returning from a week away in The Lake District we were keen to stretch our legs. But not too much!

Overstrand is a village that grew with the fishing industry.  It became popular as a beach holiday destination and many large houses were built by well to do folk at the end of the 19th century but remained a village in size. Now holidaymakers can still enjoy the beach, sea and cliff top views.

We were able to park on the side of the road for free.  There is a smallish car park right on the cliff and I imagine in the summer it might be a busy place.

For some reason we have never started a walk from or to Overstrand and we were pleasantly surprised with what we found.  Our first stop was The Cliff Top Cafe.

In a perfect spot it’s obviously doing really well with plenty of seating inside, round the side outside (where we sat) and more outside seating at the front. It was spotlessly clean and the menu boards looked inviting.  Mind you we thought the price of two smallish cups of Latte Coffee expensive at £2.75 each.

Cliff Top Cafe, Overstrand

Off we went to Cromer along the cliff top coastal path.  The fishing trade has declined over the years but certainly hasn’t disappeared as can be seen in the photo below.  Piles of lobster pots….

On our way to Cromer.

Loved the name of this trader….next time we visit we will give it a try.  It’s on our bucket list !  It’s in the car park if anyone is interested.

This van was parked in the car park. It must do a roaring trade in the summer.

Cromer Pier in the distance from the path….though it seems more than just two miles away.  The cliffs here are about 250 feet high.

A surprising number of ups and downs (not too steep) then you skirt the golf course and get glimpses of Cromer Lighthouse.  This is the Royal Cromer Golf Club and looked very nice – not that I’m an expert on golf courses…

The path joins a golfers walkway for a short distance

Before you know it you reach the outskirts of Cromer itself and the path drops into the town.

Cromer with its Pier

We picked up a portion of chips from No.1 for £1.45 to share and quick marched to the pier.  Here we sat and ate our lunch – the chips were yummy.  Lots and lots of people were out & about, some sat on the beach enjoying the sunshine.

We walked to the end of the Pier – just to the right is the Pavillion Theatre and behind me is the Cromer Lifeboat Station.  The lifeboats exit the station via a slipway at the at the end of the pier.  It has a long and heroic history.  The most famous lifeboatman being Henry Blogg – a brave man indeed.

From the end of the pier

Hero of Cromer

We headed back along the Promenade and up onto the cliff path.

Last look back


Back in Overstrand the Bucket List van was just closing.  Short opening hours at this time of the year.

We strolled along a street called The Londs.  Cottages with Flint stone frontages and cute front gardens and a tall building that I assumed was once an old lighthouse but have found out that it was actually a clock tower.

Overstrand in the afternoon sunshine

It looked like the perfect advert for a holiday in Norfolk.  We will be back.


WordPress Challenge : Variations (beach huts)


The beach huts at Southwold, Suffolk.  The most expensive huts on any beach!  Honestly they sell for unbelievable price tags.

Almost all have names and we have our favourites.   Many happy times have been spent here, strolling along.

In the summer the doors are open for everyone to check out the contents!  Some with little kitchen areas, some with changing areas and all with an assortment of seats and tables and families & friends enjoying a day at the beach.

The photograph below, taken out of season in mid-March, is called ‘Doris goddess of the wind’.  Always with bunting hanging in the porch, we admire it every time we visit.

There are a couple of ‘special’ huts selling teas, coffees and snacks and this one below is used during the summer season by the RNLI Lifeguards.

Oh I do like to be beside the seaside!  Looking forward to some warmer weather….



WordPress Challenge : Silence


I thought long and hard about this photo challenge.

There’s been so many beautifully quiet places we’ve been to and stopped at on our hikes or travels.   Hill tops or mountains covered in snow with all sounds muffled.

So I could have searched for a snowy shot but instead went for a photo I took only yesterday.  This one taken in our home county of Norfolk which is currently ‘snow free’ and many miles away from any mountain!

The remains of Honing Station, Norfolk

Only the platforms and the tiled footings of a small building on either side remain.  It’s actually closer to the small village of Briggate but this is all that is left of Honing Station.

Imagine the steam trains coming through, the whistles blowing, the travellers arriving or departing. “ALL ABOARD”

Today its a quiet place.

Wikipedia say this :

The Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway ran through the parish, part of a line that linked Great Yarmouth to Sutton Bridge via Stalham, North Walsham, Aylsham, Melton Constable, Fakenham and King’s Lynn. It opened in stages between 1865 and 1933. The line closed in 1959, although some sections survive and are now part of the Weaver’s Way footpath. Other remnants of the line that can still be seen in the parish are a cast iron, steel and brick railway bridge of 1881 on the Dilham road south of the village. At Briggate there are still the disused platforms of Honing Station.

Here is the above mentioned iron railway bridge a little way along from the platforms.

WordPress Challenge : Weathered

This photo clearly shows how well loved these Ordnance Survey maps have been on our travels!

Not always wrapped in plastic map protectors they have faced the best and worst of weather.  Sun, rain, snow and gales.   Looking a little bit ‘dog eared’ and faded around the edges we can’t throw them away, even when they are replaced.

They are, like us, a little bit old and weathered.

In order of scruffiness (with age of map) :-

1. Snowdonia (1992).  2. Lake District  ( 1995)  3. Norfolk (1996)

Love a map!




Routine returns – walks, seals, crowds and an old bomb!

After an enjoyable family get together over Christmas we were back home and back to work before the start of 2018. But what did we do with the three days off before really getting back to normal on the 2nd January?

Writing this on the 6th it all seems such a long time ago…..

Saturday 30th December 2017 – Southwold, Suffolk

A winter walk. Wrap up and you can enjoy the outdoors all year round. So, once you’ve got to where you want to be, I recommend starting the day off with a delicious sausage roll and coffee.  Adnams, Southwold (Suffolk) was our destination and this was our second breakfast of the day.  Tried and tested (many times) we love this place.

Second breakfast in the cafe at Adnams, Southwold

Southwold beach huts

What started out as a bit of a casual stroll turned into a brisk march.  It’s easy to cover the miles from Southwold to Dunwich & back in the summer but daylight is short at this time of the year and we had almost bitten off more than we could chew!  We only had 15 minutes to eat our lunch at Dunwich and get back before dusk.

A serene beach scene at Dunwich – looking back towards Southwold

Thankfully, we made it back to the car before dark and didn’t have to use our head torch!

Sunday 31st December 2017 – Norwich, Norfolk

We took the plunge and risked a shopping trip on New Years Eve. Outdoor shops are, unsurprisingly, our favourites and we were there for their 10am opening.   I bought a mint green lightweight rain jacket – couldn’t resist adding another to my collection!  For some women it’s shoes and handbags for me it’s everything outdoorsy.

Evening meal with Tims parents and home before the clocks struck midnight.  We are really soooo old.

Monday 1st January 2018 – Winterton, Norfolk

Last minute decision to take a shortish walk at our local beach – Winterton.  Previous posts have mentioned the seal colony at Horsey which has seen a population explosion and now stretches all the way down to Winterton.  The crowds were certainly out today, taking advantage of the dry sunny(ish) weather.

Winterton Beach from the dunes

Amongst the lower dunes some pups were almost old enough to take to the sea.  First they have to get rid of their baby white fur.  This one was having a good scratch and you can see the sand covered in fur.

Getting rid of the fur

The crowds grew as we circled back to Winterton village at 3pm.  Why do people leave it so late in the day to get out?

These horse riders, who had been in the sea, had confidence in their horses to tackle steep sand banks.

So what about the bomb?  Well later in the week Tim was chatting with one of his clients who had also been walking on Winterton Beach the day after us, on 2nd January.

He had had an unusual find in the sand.  Apparently it was partially covered so he kicked it a few times to clear the sand and take a closer look, as you do. He then left it as it was too heavy to move.  This turned out to be an unexplored bomb from World War 2 and was destroyed by the proper authorities later that very day!  He recognised it from a television report.

Obviously it was unlikely to have gone off, due to the time spent rolling around in the sea, but can you imagine the news headlines if a member of the public or say one of those horses I photographed had detonated it!?

Heres to a Happy Healthy Safe New Year.

The bomb was briefly mentioned on the BBC