WordPress Challenge : Focus

A bit of fun with this weeks challenge.

I’m trying to keep track of bees visiting our garden.  From what I’ve managed to see so far there’s a good variety, including the all important Honey Bee.

This keeping track was inspired by a television programme encouraging people to record their sightings.  So, in an attempt to study them, and find out a bit more about them, I’ve been photographing theses busy creatures.

Here are a couple of ‘out of focus’ shots.  Shared with you before I delete them….

 

However I’m pleased with this one (below) even if it’s not quite what I was hoping for it makes me grin.  The bee, having visited this flower is heading just out of shot!  It seems to be in focus though.

 

Focus

WordPress Challenge : Evanescent

For a split second, between waves on a stoney beach I spotted this starfish.  It took me by surprise, the wave and the starfish, but as I had the camera in hand I took the photograph you see below.

Strange thing is I’ve seen a 12 legged (or is it 12 armed?) starfish before – only once and used it in a previous challenge.

Previous challenge

My camera was at the ready because I’d just taken a photograph of Southwold Pier.  A seaside town we love to visit as often as we can.

 

Evanescent

The back garden – 1

These themed posts will be little snippets about our small garden. What grows here and what’s in flower at the moment.

We have tended to our garden for many years.  Some plants are new, some are old – lots have moved around in redesigns.  We rely on our perennials and shrubs – it means we can go away for a week or two in the growing seasons and not worry about them.  There are places to sit in the sun, places to sit in the shade and we are lucky to have an old red brick wall at the end.

This first ‘garden’ post is going to be short & sweet.

Saturday 20th May 2017

We worked on the garden all day today. The weeds have loved the two nights and one whole day of rain we’ve had this week.  We’ve had a few months of really quite dry weather.

Well, its bright and sunny now and looks set fair for at least a week.  This will be great news for the Chelsea Flower Show, a five day event by the Royal Horticultural Society held in Chelsea, London.  I think it is, more or less, world famous. We’ve only watched programmes about Chelsea on television.  It’s something to save for our old age….not that we’re that far off now!

Meantime here are a few photos from our own patch.

In the foreground flowering on the left Aquilegia. Masses of flowering Mountain Cornflower in the centre. Wisteria just starting to flower on the pagoda behind.

Hercules with moss covered feet

Weigela (‘Flamingo Pink’ – we think!). We’ve had this a while – its 6 feet tall at least

French Lavender – the bees love them

Chives – the bees love these too

Rhodededrums below the apple tree at the bottom of the garden

 

Finally, we love our plants and have fairly big borders but keep our lawn small.  This year the daisies have completely taken over and it looks like a mini meadow!

Even when you don’t travel too far from home it’s lovely out!

 

WordPress Challenge : Reflecting

This afternoon we decided to dust off the sun loungers from their winter hibernation.  It’s one of those lovely Sunday afternoons – lots of Spring bird song with some welcome warm sunshine (interspersed with fluffy cloud).

Laying back I hear, then spot, a small airplane bound for our local airport from Amsterdam.  Sometimes you can see the pale blue colouring of the KLM aircraft.  These flights often come in directly over our place, heading for Norwich, the only plane that has this flight path.

I’d been checking through photos I took yesterday so I point the camera to the sky and take the shot.  This afternoon the sun is ‘in the wrongs place’ and I’m a little slow but hey I’m in a relaxed mood.

Watching the plane go overhead it makes me reflect on holidays abroad and on childhood trips to my mothers birthplace Holland.  Reflecting on happy, carefree times.

 

 

Reflecting

WordPress Challenge : Danger

Personally I think there probably are too many signposts in our lives today.  However, this one stopped me in my tracks and maybe more important than others?!!

Photographed somewhere along the South West Coastal Path looking towards the Rame Headland, Cornwall (not too far from Plymouth).  Thankfully no warning flags were flying and no lights displayed.

<a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/danger/”>Danger!</a&gt;

The Jurrasic Coast (Part 3) – Walking the South West Coastal Path

This is the third post which details the 40 miles we walked (following the South West Coastal Path) 16th to 22nd March 2017.

Seaton to Lyme Regis (A walk like no other)

Easter Sunday and the buses were running a ‘Sunday’ service.  For that we were thankful.

We drove to Lyme Regis and parked in a huge car park on the outskirts of town.  This long stay car park cost £2.00 for the day – it’s the cheapest all day car park ticket we have paid for in years!  I must remember to write and congratulate whoever made that decision….

The bus stop was right at the car park entrance/exit.  Tim made friends with a tree.  He was looked suspiciously relaxed as we waited.  Perhaps he was preparing himself for something I hadn’t quite considered?

The bus came along then dropped us off at the start of our walk at the sea side town of Seaton.  This was our first sight of Seaton. Though I have talked about Seaton in my previous post this was infact our first visit of the week – as I mentioned in Part 1 these posts are describing the walking routes from the furthest west to the furthest east, not the order we did them in!

Initially crossing a bridge away from the town, over the River Axe, we took a steep tarmac lane to Axe Cliff Golf Club and then the course beyond that.  Passing through a golf course can be an exciting thing especially if you can hear voices of players but can’t actually see them!

Along a sheltered lane we came to a junction with a cautionary note.

‘Please note that it takes approximately 3 1/2 to 4 hours walk to Lyme Regis’. Fair enough I thought.

‘The terrain can be difficult and arduous.  There is no permissive access to the sea or inland along this stretch of the path’.

Er, OK.  ‘So, that’s for people who aren’t used to walking’  I said to Tim.  He nodded solemnly.

Needless to say we continued along our way, skirting fields at the top of the cliff.  The bright yellow crop of Oil Seed Rape (rapeseed) seems to be covering great swathes the countryside these days.

Then we turned left and started to descend, at first to an area called Goat Island.  Landslips have and continue to affect this bit of coast and Goat Island used to be attached to the cliff top. I couldn’t see why it’s called island though….or infact Goat.  Maybe some poor goat fell to its death in the landslip?!

Orchids – these are called Pyramid Orchids I think.  We got all excited seeing one on its own and then, just round the corner, there were several….

Shortly after this the path dropped again into the trees.  I had no idea that the open view, looking back at the open landscape now, would be the last I would have for the next 3 hours.  Look how innocent I am.  This is Axmouth Undercliff (Nature Reserve).

So, we were now in a densely covered enclosed area – one way in and one way out.

We enjoyed it too (at first) with the narrow path twisting up and turning down then twisting and turning some more.  ‘Thought it was supposed to be cloudy’ I said then  ‘Where are we?’ (meaning – ‘how far had we gone?’).  ‘Lunch at the next bench’ Tim said.

After almost 2 hours we found a solitary bench and stopped for lunch.  The sun shone (through the gaps in the trees) and it was warm but we had found a breeze.  At this point three people passed us – looking as pleased to see us as we were to see them.  We were not alone.

For the entire time we were ‘in the trees’ there was no view. There were a few magical moments when the dense woodland opened up a bit and there were wild flowers growing on either side of the path.  That was lovely and kept us going.

Then we got a glimpse of white cliff.  Wow.  This whole area – these miles of trees and plants exist here because of landslides.  It has formed a sanctuary and some, often rare, species have thrived.

Walkers coming from Lyme Regis began to pass us.  Some simply carrying a bottle of water and sauntering along.  Hope they knew what they were doing.  Felt like saying ‘you’ve got three hours of walking, you do realise that do you?’

On and on we went, trying to guess how much further we had before Lyme Regis.  There were no info boards or finger posts with mileage indicators but thankfully the ground was bone dry.  This was a little bit unusual apparently as it can be quite a muddy walk (according to a lady we met on our morning bus journey).  We were lucky.

Finally, finally the path opened up. Big grins on our faces.  Somewhere back there we had crossed the border into Dorset and we were pretty pleased.

To really get a sense of freedom we took a steep stepped path down to the sea and joined the masses on the harbour wall at Lyme Regis.  We gulped down the rest of our squash and breathed in that salty air.

Seatown to Lyme Regis

For this walk (the last one of the week) we walked east to west.

The dry clear weather meant that we should do Gold Cap.  Gold Cap is a sea cliff/hill and the highest point of the whole South West Coastal Path at 627 feet (191 metres). It’s distinctive golden top can be seen from miles away.

Once again we took a bus out to the start of our walk. Unfortunately (for us) we had a ‘walk in’ meaning the bus stop wasn’t quite where we needed it to stop and had to walk down to the coastal path from a main road.  Along the way we chatted to some thatchers busy replacing a roof of a pretty cottage.  Nice guys doing a decent trade.

So, up we went to Gold Cap from Seatown.  To be honest we found it a doddle – easy peasy.  All our mountain walking paid off.  We strolled over the top and admired the views, albeit a little bit misty this morning.

Down we went following the path through lovely countryside facing views along the coastline to everything we had covered over the previous few days.

With the sun now shining and with a carefree pace we thought it wouldn’t be long before we would decend to Charmouth Beach for lunch. Then we came across another unexpected diversion sign.  Surely not.

Obeying the sign we diverted – quite a long way as it turned out.

By the time we eventually reached Charmouth we were feeling a bit miffed as we had missed the coastal stroll we had been enjoying.  Tim posed at a sign we wouldn’t have seen if we hadn’t been diverted.

At the beach we had our lunch right next to the busy Cafe and Fossil Museum.  People were waiting for the tide to turn before setting off on fossil hunting expeditions.  We didn’t need to wait for a tide – we had a couple more miles to complete.

We walked out of Charmouth, up the road leading into the village, through a small wood, across a golf course (quickly!) and into the outskirts of Lyme Regis.  We then turned into the most incredible bluebell wood we had ever seen.  Tim, with camera in hand, set about trying to capture the scene. I strolled about thinking this was a very fine end to the week.

Then I spotted a home made tree swing and decided to give it a try – I am such a big kid.

So, we really ended our week on a high, as we strolled down to the town.  Great views, fine paths, interesting journeys, dry weather.  We bought an ice cream and quietly sat an admired the view.  Who could ask for more?

Postscript

I have written three posts forming a trilogy to describe our journey on foot along the South West Coastal Path from East Devon into Dorset.  On our day off we went back to Lyme Regis to photograph the harbour.  We thoroughly enjoyed exploring this historic place.

 

Then, we went in search for fossils on Charmouth Beach.  I felt sure we would be tripping over them but, unfortunately, after several hours of head down and scouring the beach, we came away empty handed.

I was so disappointed (and the above sign didn’t help one bit) that Tim took me into The Old Forge Fossil Shop in Lyme Regis and bought me a small Ammonite.  In my eyes fossils should be considered as treasures and although mine is ‘shop bought’ it is very precious.  I love it.

Questions for fellow bloggers :

Have you found a fossil?  What and where?  Be great to hear about your finds.