Category Archives: Norfolk

Sailing away on a very warm day

Sunday 25th August 2019

It was almost 30 degrees and we had to leave our simmering garden for somewhere cooler.

Instead of heading to the beach (our nearest being about a mile away) to join the masses we went to our closest river, The Thurne, and took a slow stroll along it.   Here we found a gentle breeze.

Yes its been a warm couple of days and we really shouldn’t complain about that but it’s what happens in this country isn’t it?  We’ve always got the weather to talk about.

In full flow of the school summer holidays the population of Norfolk swells as the holiday makers come to enjoy beaches, waterways and open countryside.  It was certainly busy busy on the river bank at Potter Heigham.

Hire boats and privately owned boats of all shapes and sizes with assorted passengers are a fairly normal sight on the waterways in this part of the world but it was the bigger sailing yachts and their crews (just beyond the red sailed boat) that really caught my eye.

On board were several groups of teenagers who were probably doing something they had never done before – experiencing a bygone era when telephones were a luxury.  These wonderful wooden boats were from Hunters Yard, Ludham which is about 2 miles from this spot.  I’ve had a quick look at their website and they promote youth sailing which I think is fantastic.

Here they are a little closer before raising the sails.

A few set off from their moorings, heading in the same direction as us.  I couldn’t help but take a few photos as we travelled along.

The Thurne heads north to a large broad called Hickling.  The first of the large sailing yacht with the youngesters onboard, legs over the edge in the water, headed that way and we watched them disappear while sitting on the bank near the footpath.

Another came along shortly afterwards but the teacher (skipper) wasn’t sure whether to go straight on or left.  A frantic radio message finally had a reply that he needed which was just before I was about to shout out ‘left’. They circled and headed away…

How strange that he didn’t know the route.  Was he a teacher or a hired skipper I wondered.

The last to come past us before we left this spot was a small sail boat with a couple on board.  They appeared in the first photo.  They sailed straight on – to a quieter waterway with an air of experience.

Their boat was called ‘Serene’.

When comparing these boats which is best and which would you prefer, the large yachts or the smaller boat?

Size Matters

 

A roadside display

Roadside verge.

After almost a week of rain it’s a wonder these flowers are still standing.

This verge is on a quiet country lane and I think the seeds must have been scattered by the owner of a house opposite as they only appeared in one spot and only opposite the house.

I think there does seem to be a growing realisation that wild flowers are important as they are appearing in towns and cities  bit more often now.  A growing trend that’s such a good thing for our insects and wildlife.

Photo Challenge Display

 

 

Weekly Prompt : Sphere

A weekly prompt with the word Sphere.  A bit of a test from GC and Sue.

I was about to give up on this but just as we finished a long walk yesterday, up along the North Norfolk coastal path, I stopped and thought, well I wonder if this might do.  A wall made of Flint with the occasional red brick.

It’s the flints that caught my eye.  If you could see those ancient cobbled stones as a whole (not half hidden in the wall) lots would be spheres wouldn’t they?

Not knowing enough about architecture or building materials I have googled ‘Flint’ and ‘Norfolk’ for a bit of information.   Wikipedia often helps…..

Flint, knapped or unknapped, has been used from antiquity (for example at the Late Roman fort of Burgh Castle in Norfolk) up to the present day as a material for building stone walls, using lime mortar, and often combined with other available stone or brick rubble. It was most common in parts of southern England, where no good building stone was available locally, and brick-making not widespread until the later Middle Ages. It is especially associated with East Anglia, but also used in chalky areas stretching through Hampshire, Sussex, Surrey and Kent to Somerset. Flint was used in the construction of many churches, houses, and other buildings, for example the large stronghold of Framlingham Castle. Many different decorative effects have been achieved by using different types of knapping or arrangement and combinations with stone (flushwork), especially in the 15th and early 16th centuries.<\em>

I will do my best to photograph a few more Flint buildings in future.

Photo Challenge Sphere

Orange – A glow in my heart

My favourite colour?  Maybe.  A colour that definitely belongs to the Dutch.

I was born in the UK but my mum was born in Holland.  This makes me half Dutch doesn’t it? Not officially of course but that orange colour certainly makes me glow.

So here goes with a few photos of orange things.

These can now be grown in the UK.  Global warming? or maybe you need a greenhouse?

Tim is now a fan or orange too and loves to wear his orange crocs.  I am, thankfully, just out of shot or maybe too far away – swimming in the North Sea.

Our trusty beach umbrella was bright orange a few years ago – now it’s a much paler shade.  Couldn’t resist this photo though – last summer on Southwold Beach.

Mid summer – beautiful flowers with bee.

On Southwold seafront parked outside one of the beach huts I spotted, well couldn’t miss, this bicycle.  Apparently imported from Holland.  Very tempted to steal it!

Finally, a shot of something that comes to mind when thinking of Holland.

Photo Challenge Orange

Ancient monument with fencing

Sunday 24th February.  Glorious weather for our local walk today.  No jackets were needed!

Ludham village to How Hill then onto St Benets Abbey – it’s about 8 miles across fields and along paths skirting marshes. This is in the heart of the Norfolk Broads and not too far for us to get to – about 20 minutes or so in the car.

After 5 miles of walking we reached this spot.  An ancient monument – popular with artists and photographers who have come along and enjoyed this ‘middle of no where’ spot for at least 200 years.

Set on the banks of the river, only the ruined remains of a gatehouse and a mill which was built much later (next to/inside the gatehouse) still stands. Though there are some outlines of what was thought to be a nave or alter at ground level further away.  The gatehouse remains are 14th century.

I have no idea why there is iron fencing around one side – the purpose is a bit of a mystery to me!  It makes for a nice shot though.

We sat on the river bank just behind my photographing spot and enjoyed watching sail boats and cruisers, listening to geese and other water loving birds and just thought, wow this is amazing…..

Photo Challenge Fences

 

Under big skies : Norfolk

Our home country of Norfolk is known for big skies. The land is generally flat so I suppose it gives you more sky to look at.  Nothing or not much to block the clouds or blue view!

This posting includes photographs taken only in Norfolk with, what I hope, are some nice looking skies.

This first one is a misty view of dunes and sky with the village if Winterton on Sea as a distant backdrop.  The church is the only thing visible as a silhouette.  It was taken on one of our regular ‘home’ walks back in January 2017.

Just last weekend we saw the sun setting at the end of a long walk near Waxham.  Once again taken from a dune which I had frantically scrambled up (through brambles!) from a lower footpath.  Not hugely dramatic but i was pleased with it after my efforts.

Sometimes it’s what’s moving through the sky that grabs your attention!  A lunch stop on the beach near Horsey. Had to be quick with the camera.

If we’re just out for a picnic we take our trusty Sportbrella and pitch it wherever we like.  That orange glow looks best under moody skies!  This is Weybourne in North Norfolk.

More often than not its that typical Norfolk scene that we love, it’s how Norfolk is recognised.  This is Horsey Mill recently renovated to its former glory.

Photo Challenge Sky